Let’s Improve Safety Together

In the early 1980s two hotel fires within 6 months in Las Vegas, prompted changes to the fire code, and that has saved many lives. Nevada led the way implementing statewide requirements, and the nation followed. The first was at the MGM Grand and it took 87 lives and injured 700 people, it was the second worst hotel fire in US History…and Nevada and much of the rest of the country took action–new fire codes were enacted that required sprinklers in high-rises and large public areas, automatic elevator recalls and heating ventilation shutoffs, as well as extensive alarm systems and those little evacuation maps on the back of every hotel room door. The lessons of the disaster resonated beyond Las Vegas, the MGM blaze was also studied by psychologists, insurance firms, bar associations and even used in NASA presentations as a lesson in “safety standards” and “hazard controls.” At the time, every structure in the state was required to comply—no exemptions, no grandfathering. Resorts, schools, and universities grumbled at the expense but understood the necessity. As Tom Huddleston, Nevada state fire marshal at the time, said, “No matter how unpopular it is, it’s still something that has to be accomplished. We don’t want to lose people.”
I think it is clear those words should still resonate today, WE DON’T WANT TO LOSE PEOPLE. As we examine the tragedies that keep occurring, let’s review our safety codes and options, and improve them. At Threat Extinguisher, we agree that the discussion on safety and how to keep our public spaces, schools, churches, government buildings, hotels, restaurants, etc. safer is not a comfortable discussion, but we must discuss it and find options to keep people safe, because the same is true in 2017 as it was in 1980…no matter how unpopular the topic of active shooters is we must find new options to improve safety in public places ….at Threat Extinguisher we are striving to save lives.
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